[CULTURE] NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL 2019 BEHIND THE LENS OF JAMIE WATERS - Viper
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[CULTURE] NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL 2019 BEHIND THE LENS OF JAMIE WATERS

Without a doubt London’s biggest cultural event of every year, a celebration of which was first held in 1966 as an offshoot of the Trinidad Carnival, celebrating Caribbean culture and traditions thriving from London’s streets, boroughs and communities. Arriving in the smouldering heat, a week ago today saw Notting Hill flourishing with waves of positive vibes, vivid colours, and quaking bass-boosted sound systems. This year provided an airiness of a different kind of excitement, different from previous years. 2019 was extra special with the announcement of Dancehall queen, Vybz Kartel Collaborator  & ‘Mi Like It’ EP Boss Lady ‘Spice’ to take over the Red Bull Sound System Float. 

With the chaotic mayhem in full swing, in and amongst the beating sun mixed with a weed-potent smokey crowd, taking a stand behind the lens of a film camera was multidisciplinary creative Jamie Waters, who had captured the full essence and spirit of Notting Hill Carnival through a display of immersive portraits. Exclusively presented by Viper, we caught up with Jamie where he shared some words on Carnival and the process around his works…

NOTTING HILL CARNIVAL 2019 C/o Jamie Waters 

“As a photographer passionate about people, my work is often very up close and personal. I enjoy taking a moment to talk to my subject, establishing a brief connection that brings out their character in the resulting image. Working predominantly with film photography has taught me a lot about light and how to slow down to frame a moment the way I see it, typically in a more abstract sense that I will then incorporate with graphics or physical scans of objects and materials. With my Carnival series, I stepped back from that process, instead of honing in on the energy and euphoria of the crowd without distracting from the subject. Being a photographer is quite a privilege, as it enables me to share such personal moments with strangers that I would be unlikely to encounter without my camera” – Jamie Waters 

Keep locked in on more Arts & Culture & Jamie’s vision by staying tuned to @vipermagazine & @jamie_a_waters

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